RV Saga

Camping in Newhalem Campground

For the first time on this journey, I slept in until about 7:15 this morning. I felt relaxed in this Newhalem campground. But we had to pack up and move. We decided to check the loop C of the campground first before heading to other campgrounds. Quite a few sites were available on loop C. We picked site 98 because it looked like it was easy to back up the trailer and it has a big backyard.

A Huge Backyard at Newhalem Campsite

A Huge Backyard at Newhalem Campsite

It started to rain when we started to back up. It was the first rain we had on our journey since July 1. We had to unhitch the trailer amid the light rain because it was parked on a slight slope. It took us quite some time to get the trailer unhitched and leveled this time. I wish there was an easy way to unhitch the trailer.

The roaring sound of the Skagit river came to ear from the low land near by. The site is on a higher ground looking over a woods filled with pink wild flowers. Some of the trees were burned. We liked its openness and close to the restroom. Fresh water, drinking fountain, garbage dumpsters and recycle bins are near the restroom. Each picnic table has a yellow warning sign about items that should not left unattended any time because this is a bear country.

Warning Sign

Warning Sign

Unlike the Marble Creek campground, there is no firewood for sale. So we started our scavenger hunting and collected some firewood and charcoals from the vacant sites. We got two big bags that would make a big camp fire.

Streamlined Dish Washing

Streamlined Dish Washing

The siren alarmed once loudly again at 12:00 p.m. That was to announce that the nearby dam was releasing water. Stephen practiced the extreme water management and washed the dishes on the picnic table. He used the first basin filled with soapy water to wash dishes, and then rinsed the washed dishes in the second basin, and rinsed the dishes again in the third basin.

Went to the “To learn a tree” trail. There are interpretive signs of local grown trees along the trail. I think I can identify firs, cedars and western hemlocks now. The western hemlock is the state tree of Washington. The trail is by the Skagit river. From a campsite by the river, we saw a cascading creek joined the river on the other side. The woods are covered by moss from ground to the branches of trees. The moss laden limbs of trees look like the witch’s fingers. I wonder how it feel to camp in a tent on this campsite.

Escape Trailer in Newhalem Campground

Escape Trailer in Newhalem Campground

The finale of the day was the campfire and brats on campfire. Another day in Newhalem campground.

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